Physiological Effects of jazz dance articles Training for a Jazz Dance Performan
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Physiological Effects of jazz dance articles Training for a Jazz Dance Performan
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Your message has been successfully sent to your colleague. Your message has been successfully sent to your colleague. The physiological responses to training for a creative jazz dance performance were determined in college-age beginning to intermediate female dancers. Eight subjects were tested pre- and posttraining for O 2 peak during a graded exercise test and body composition . Subjects participated in jazz dance training sessions 4 days week, 60–120 min a day for 10 weeks at heart rate intensities 70–85% HR max . After 10 weeks, subjects performed in a creative jazz dance concert and heart rates were recorded after each of three dance performance routines. The mean performance concert heart rate was 94.3% of posttest HR max. Posttesting revealed significant increases in relative and absolute O 2 peak performance and maximal time on the treadmill. No significant differences were noted for body composition . In conclusion, jazz dance, if performed within American College of Sports Medicine exercise training guidelines, jazz dance articles will elicit cardiorespiratory improvement in college-age females. Exercise Physiology Research Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, California State University–Northridge, Northridge, California 91330. Keyword Highlighting Highlight selected keywords in the article text. Alan Galanti, Michelle L.; Holland, George J.; Shafranski, Paulette; Loy, Steven F.; Vincent, William J.; Heng, Ming K. This website uses cookies. why was jazz music so popular in the 1920s